The Samaritan Update

“Mount Gerizim,

All the Days of Our Lives”


 

May/June 2019                                                                                                                              Vol. XVIII - No 5

 

In This Issue

 

·         Congratulations

·         7 Shehadeh articles

·         Orhof photos

·         Tsedaka Tour

·         Links

·         From the Editor

·         Fisher Libraries

·         Hill Museum (5 MSS)

·         Aleppo Community?

·         Pentateuch in Wyoming

·         BL Digitized MS

·         Books

·         Bibliography

·         Biblio

Your link to the Samaritan Update Index

2019, the Samaritan Community number 820.

 

 Future Events

It has been 3657 years since the entrance into the Holy Land which happened on the Sixth Month of the Hebrew Year.

 (Samaritan’s typical calendar) 

 

2019

Festival of Weeks June 3- June 9, 2019

Festival of the first day of the Seventh Month -Sept. 29, 2019

Day of Atonement – Oct. 8, 2019

Festival of Sukkot – Oct. 13, 2019

Festival of the 8th Day – Oct 20, 2019

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Congratulations!!!!
New Baby Girl, Basma was born in Mount Gerizim - Daughter of Salwa and Yehsaahq b. Ibtisam and the late Priest Maasleeh b. High Priest Phinhas. Thursday, 9.5.2019 (photo right)

A new couple in Holon, Israel:
Ortal& Abraahm B. Yaashishaakaar Maarheeb
Tuesday Evening 18.6.2019

(Image left)

 


A new Couple in Qiriat Luza, Mount Gerizim, Samaria Nethanela and Ziv B. Samar and Shamir Altif

Tuesday evening 25.6.2019 (Image right)

Continue reading at http://shomron0.tripod.com/articles/123_years_since.pdf

Continue reading at http://shomron0.tripod.com/articles/Mosess_Praise_.pdf

 

Continue reading at http://shomron0.tripod.com/articles/thehighpriestamram.pdf

Continue reading at http://shomron0.tripod.com/articles/soft_voices.pdf

 

Continue reading at http://shomron0.tripod.com/articles/thegreatpower.pdf

 

Continue reading at http://shomron0.tripod.com/articles/thebookofmourning.pdf

 

Continue reading at http://shomron0.tripod.com/articles/alwaysthereissomebody.pdf

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Ori Orhof Photos of the Pilgrimage posted 6 9 2019

See all the photos at https://www.flickr.com/photos/oriorhof/albums?fbclid=IwAR01sa_iaULmpgWQPZOjAsm0T6A9HAkwffvbuDhhghBcdzTrXLwFWrE_zbE

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In pics: circumcision ceremony of eight-day Samaritan baby

Source: Xinhua| 2019-06-16

Taim kahen, an eight-day Samaritan baby, lies on a bed during a traditional circumcision ceremony at the Mount Gerizim, above the West Bank city of Nablus, June 16, 2019. (Xinhua/Ayman Nobani)

http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-06/16/c_138148255.htm

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Benyamim Tsedaka schedule for the Summer, 2019:

 

June, 10 - Milano, Bibliothka Ambrosiana

June 16 - Rome, Vatican Barberini Library

June 23 - Sicily, Seminarians on the Israelite Samaritans

June 30 - Paris, Bibliotheca National + Awarding the Samaritan Medal for Humanitarian Achievements to Rabbi Gabriel Hagai

July 6 - London, British Library

 

Benyamim Tsedaka will be happy to meet seekers of the Israelite Samaritans and Samaritan Studies in each place. You can contact him at sedakab@yahoo.com

 

The Samaritan Pentateuch is in the book, Milano: Storia Del Popolo E Pel Popolo (1871) (Italian) by Cesare Cantu. According to the book, a Samaritan Pentateuch from Shechem came from the rich library of the collector of books and manuscript, Gian Vincenzo Pinello (1535-1601). ‘His collection of manuscripts, when it was purchased from his estate in 1608 for the Biblioteca Ambrosiana, filled 70 cases. ‘

It appears that Joseph Scaliger was friends with Pinello! This would explain the source of the manuscript.

Nicolas-Claude Fabri de Peiresc (1580 1637) was a student in his house at the moment of Pinello’s death and spent some of the following weeks studying in his library, taking notes from it’s catalogues and keeping up his correspondence. Peiresc was 21 at that time.

See a good article: https://www.academia.edu/3868798/Gian_Vincenzo_Pinellis_collection_of_catalogues_of_private_libraries_in_sixteenth-century_Europe

 

On June 12, 2019, Benny posted on his Facebook page a couple images of a 15th century Samaritan fragment with Duet 24: 16-25:8, while researching in Milan. Page Size: 31:23 cm; size of the text: 15:24 cm. Images below by Benny. Great find Benny!!!!

 

 

Also see

Noja, Sergio <1931-2008>

Un foglio del Pentateuco samaritano con traduzione in arabo nei manoscritti dell'Ambrosiana / Sergio Noja Noseda

Dettagli

Descrizione fisica: P. 49-66

Lingua: Italiano (lingua del testo, colonna sonora, ecc.)

Fa parte di: Il mio cuore è a oriente : studi di linguistica storica, filologia e cultura ebraica dedicati a Maria Luisa Mayer Modena / a cura di Francesco Aspesi, Vermondo Brugnatelli, Anna Linda Callow, Claudia Rosenzweig

http://ambrosiana.comperio.it/opac/detail/view/ambro:catalog:798401

 

Library Pinacoteca Accademia Ambrosiana

 

Manoscritti S.P.II.248

Dettagli

Descrizione fisica: ff. 231 ; perg. ; 102x78 mm

Data: 1000-1050

Lingua: Samaritano (lingua del testo, colonna sonora, ecc.)

Comprende: 2 titoli Nascondi elenco Mostra in ricerca

Pentateuco samaritano

Ehrle, Franz <1845-1934>. Lettera autografa del card. Franz Ehrle a mons. Achille Ratti ; 25

Nota:

Su c. 231v : &quot;Biblia Samaritana quinque libri Moisis a fratre Thoma Hovaridri ord. min. reg. obsv. in Civitate Sichem inventa&quot;

Restaurato a Modena nel Laboratorio del sig. Gius. Ferrari a spese della Soprintendenza bibliografica di Milano (10/2/1955)

Codices hebraici bybliothecae ambrosianae descripti a Carolo Bernheimer, Florentiae apud Leonem Olschki Bibliopolam, 1933 pp. 179-180

Dati generali (100)
Tipo di data: data incerta

Data di pubblicazione: 1000-1050

Manoscritti (149)
Supporto del libro: 
pergamena

Materiale della legatura: pelle, cuoio

Stato di conservazione della legatura: restaurato

http://ambrosiana.comperio.it/opac/detail/view/ambro:catalog:116620

 

Manuscripts SPII.248

Details

Physical description: ff. 231; for G. ; 102x78 mm

Date: 1000-1050

Language: Samaritan (text language, soundtrack, etc. )

Samaritan Pentateuch

Ehrle, Franz <1845-1934>. Autograph letter of card. Franz Ehrle to Msgr. Achille Ratti ; 25

Note: On c. 231v: & quot; Biblia Samaritana quinque books Moisis a friar Thoma Hovaridri ord. min. reg. obsv. in Civitate Sichem invents & quot;

Restored in Modena in the Laboratory of Mr. Gius. Ferrari at the expense of the Bibliographic Superintendency of Milan (10/2/1955)

Codices hebraici bybliothecae ambrosianae descripti to Carolo Bernheimer, Florentiae apud Leonem Olschki Bibliopolam, 1933 pp. 179-180

General data (100)
Type of date: uncertain date

Date of publication: 1000-1050

Manuscripts (149)
Support of the book: parchment

Ligature material: leather, leather

State of preservation of the binding: restored

(Image right of SPII.248 by Benyamim Tsedaka)

 

Also, it would be interesting to see if the manuscript, if it is a manuscript or a printed book, is mentioned in the book Codices hebraici Bibliothecae Ambrosianae (Pl. X. Florentiae, 1933) by Carlo Bernheimer.

 

Yet in the book on page 5, the description is ‘A Samaritan Pentateuch in Octavo.’ I cannot personally say I have ever heard of a written Pentateuch being in Octavo. It sounds like a European reproduction.

 

When Benyamim Tsedaka was in Milan at the Ambrosiana library last year looking for Samaritan manuscripts and with the librarians were unable to locate any. Benny visited the Library once again, June 10-15, 2019 to have a deeper search for Samaritan manuscripts. The above photo was taken by Benny in 2018.

~~~~~

 

Benyamim Tsedaka posted on his Facebook page on May 29th, 2019, that Lior Jacoby of Bar-Ilan University in Israel has visited the University of Johannes Gutenberg in Germany. Dr. Helmut Hinkle, director and Jacoby were looking in the manuscript collection and located a Samaritan scroll of Genesis. It appears that it was purchased by Prof. Nicholas Adler (1870-1972) while visiting Israel in the 1960s.

Accordingly the scroll and eight Samaritan Torah books from the 13th to 20th centuries will be donated to the National Library in Jerusalem.

Let us hope they will be digitized and placed online.

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Benny’s Journey in Europe in Five Cities – Summer, 2019

The Ninth day, Rome, Italy

Tuesday, 18.6.2019

To my surprise, I found that instead of the four manuscripts that I had expected to find in the Vatican library purchased by the distinguished traveler Pietri de Valli in 1616 in Damascus, the list prepared by Dr. Proverbio revealed to me that there were 15 manuscripts in the library more than the Italian traveler had acquired. A reason for excitement and celebration in the heart.

According to the rules of the library, it is not possible to order more than five manuscripts a day. I immediately gave in to the rules. I saw this as a compliment, when Dr. Proverbio asked me to cooperate in preparing a detailed catalog of the 15 manuscripts, because no one had prepared it so far. It is clear to me that the 11 additional manuscripts came to the library in 1815, 200 years after they were purchased in Damascus, the four correspondents by de la Valle.

Four of the five manuscripts I examined today were ancient, three bought by Pietro de la Vella - a Hebrew Torah scroll, a Torah scroll in Aramaic translation and a collection of the Dafter prayers, all from the 13th and 14th centuries; A letter sent by the Samaritans to France, at the end of the 18th century, to those they believed to be Samaritans, and a collection of three notebooks, containing first Hebrew passages from the beginning of Genesis and a number of names and an opening passage of an Aramaic translation dotted with the Book of Genesis.

I will see what the remaining manuscripts are, the two additional days of inspection, Tuesdays and Wednesdays a week. Unfortunately, there is no way to photograph in the library. I ordered one sample photo - 8 Euro per page, from each of the manuscripts I checked.

 

Journey in Europe in Five Cities – Summer, 2019

The tenth day, Rome, Italy Wednesday, 19.6.2019

 

The disappointing part of the collection in the Vatican

Now that I have been equipped with a visitor ID card, I do not need a special permit to enter the Vatican compound. Today I went straight to the library.

I came full of observations to check the second trimester of the collection's 15 volumes, and the size of the expectations was the size of the disappointments, except for one handwritten manuscript, number 8, which was purchased in its entirety. [1828-1928], on matters of halakhah, which constitutes about 100 instructions / proofs of the truth of the Samaritan Israeli heritage. The book covers 860 pages, because Abraham Tzadka the Tsarfi brings it in two columns, a column in Hebrew and a column in Arabic in Hebrew letters.

In the essay, Avraham argues with the Samaritan commentators known as Pinchas ben Isaac HaCohen of his time [1840-1898] and commentators and ancient halachic scholars, and he disagreed with the sages of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam without mentioning their names.

Sir Avi Ratzon Ben-Binyamim Tzedakah [1922-1990] assembled most of Avraham's works, thereby redeeming the great portion of his works containing hundreds of poems. My father also made sure to include the poems of Abraham, who was the subject of his admiration, in the prayer books he published, which are now the source books of the Samaritan copywriters after his time.

It is interesting to note that the entire composition is now in the Vatican library, and anyone who wants to study it and publish it knows where to go.

What is disappointing is that manuscripts 7-6 and 9-10 are bundles of loose leaves that the Vatican library bought two years ago from the Dutch antiquities dealer in Uman, who bought it from a Jerusalem antiques seller who bought it from the estate of Avraham ben Nur Tzedaka. The estate is usually divided into single pages between a number of Jerusalemite sellers, including manuscripts of two and three languages. They sold it to European antique sellers. Thus the estate was part of the Vatican Library, Writings 6 through 10.

My pain grew to see manuscript number 9, which is nothing but the original manuscript written by my master, my father - a copy of "Marka Marka" in Aramaic and in translation into Arabic, as a collection of loose pages in disarray. Fortunately, the manuscript was duplicated in hundreds of units and is found in every Samaritan private library. Apparently this manuscript was borrowed by the owner of the estate from my father and did not return to him.

I spoke with the director of the collection of manuscripts at the Vatican library, Professor Probeiro, that I would catalog the collection of Samaritan manuscripts and arrange the pages of the coupons I found in writings 7-6, 9 and 10.

In the afternoon my new friends, the Samaritan Israelis of Rome, Enzo and Maor, arrived one by one. We spent a little time together, and they returned to their places. Later in the week we will meet again.

 

Journey in Europe in Five Cities – Summer, 2019

The eleventh day, Rome, Italy Thursday, 20.6.2019

 

Last day at the Vatican Library

The last day of the three days at the Vatican Library met my expectations like the first day. Four complete manuscripts, but not bound, purchased before 1924, probably by the priest Amram Ben Yitzhak [1889-1980, later to become a high priest in 1961-1980]. Two of them in his beautiful handwriting in Arabic, a pleasant surprise for me, that I have seen so far his clear handwriting in ancient Hebrew.

 

One of them is the Book of Questions and Answers in the Torah, and the other is the 18th-century sage Tevya ben-Av, whose metrical identity, is called Leviticus. Hacohen Amram writes in an orderly manner in pleasant Arabic writing, clear and fluent.

The other two manuscripts are the "Book of Days" of the father of Fatah, with a continuous introduction and description from the days of Joshua Bin Nun until the eighth century CE, with the completion of the names of the great priests from then on to Ya'akov ben Aharon (1816-1916). ]. The second book is the chronicle of the book "Joshua Ben Nun" in Arabic, which was held in Egypt in the 13th century. The first forty chapters on Joshua and the next ten chapters extend until the third century CE. The copy of the two manuscripts is probably the priest Avishah ben Pinchas [1882-1961, later a high priest in the years 1961-1943], as his handwriting is familiar to me from his library.

 

Torah scroll from Damascus

The fifth manuscript is the fourth in the ancient manuscripts, which was previously in the Barbarini collection in the Vatican and was transferred to the Central Library. The fourth manuscript purchased by the high-ranking Italian traveler Pietro de la Vella in Damascus in 1616.

The manuscript is written on leather, from the 13th century, a three-language Torah scroll, Hebrew-Arabic-Aramaic in this order. But with many completeness in the paper made by the library man. 72 of the 264 pages are complete in Hebrew and 26 in Arabic.

With a manuscript missing so many pages, after I discovered what I discovered, it is too late to ask what drove my late relatives. The sage Yisrael ben Gamliel was right to use this manuscript for an edition he duplicated in 1967? Israel completed the missing pages of a manuscript of the British Library No. 7562, but much of what was completed was copied in the 19th century, in the handwriting of the high priest Amram Ben Shlomo [1874-1809, his years of 1874-1855], 600 years after the time of writing the Vatican library hand, placed before my eyes in its large and impressive pages [35 x 25 cm].

A great riddle is who leaves the many missing pages in the Vatican manuscript, between 1616 and the beginning of the 19th century? It is clear that the missing pages are not in the library of St. Petersburg in Russia.

In any case, it is now clear to me that there was no justification to reproduce a complete edition of a Torah scroll consisting of at least three books of the Torah.

 

Journey in Europe in Five Cities – Summer, 2019

11-12 The eleventh and twelfth days, Rome, Italy Friday-Saturday, 21-22.6.2019

 

The weekend will mark the success of finally reaching the collection of Samaritan manuscripts in the Vatican Library. I succeeded in sharing the library's staff and researchers with the beloved Miriam Hamdan of Milan and with you dear readers.

Although there was a certain disappointment in part of the collection, I was compensated with a vision, review and catalog of the four Samaritan manuscripts, the first to arrive in Europe in 1616.

They were preceded by a letter at the end of the 16th century, sent by the Samaritans in Egypt to the interrogator Josef Scaliger, in which they informed him of their refusal to give him manuscripts. Pietro de la Vella, the Italian traveler in 1616, refused to sell him Samaritan manuscripts in Cairo, Gaza, and Nablus until he came to Damascus and managed to purchase the four manuscripts from the Samaritan community in Damascus, nine years before a pogrom destroyed the community there, with the exception of one family, To Nablus and is the basis for the family of the dahns in Nablus, and today in Holon and in the Druze.

The two manuscripts of the four were the basis for the first publication of the Hebrew text and the Samaritan translation of Aramaic into the Torah. Both were also incorporated into polyglotte-a multi-lingual doctrine-of Paris and London in the same century, the seventeenth century. The publication aroused a storm among researchers in Europe to the point that they were split into two camps, which held that the Torah version in the hands of the Samaritans was a replica of the traditional Jewish text, in contrast to those who claimed that the original text of the Torah had finally been discovered.

The discoveries of Qumran in the middle of the twentieth century and a comparative study of the relationship between the two versions of the Septuagint - the translation of the Torah into Greek - made the two texts equal in research, although the debate is closer to the earliest version.

Since the transfer of the first manuscripts, European researchers have managed to deceive 40 Torah scrolls and other writings by the end of the eighteenth century. But since the middle of the 19th century, the dam has been breached, especially in the large sale of the Geniza in the synagogue in Nablus, with 1348 manuscripts, to the karate scholar, collector Avraham Pirkovitz. On the trips to Europe by Samaritans from Nablus, another 2,500 manuscripts were sold, a result of the impoverishment and impoverishment of the community in Nablus until the middle of the twentieth century.

With the improvement of the economic situation of the community in the second half of the twentieth century, the sale of manuscripts by the Samaritans ceased. Today, the Samaritans' private libraries in The Hague and Holon have about 1,000 manuscripts.

The Samaritan manuscripts are well preserved in the libraries of the world, and most importantly, accessible to every spring. In the last decade, digitization of manuscripts began. Pioneers include the Michigan State University Library, the British Library in London and the National Library of Paris.

The community committees in Holon and the Druze should be able to come out and preserve the manuscripts in the private libraries of the Samaritans, or at least allow them to photograph them digitally and transfer them to the Internet in order to be accessible to all. A great deal of effort is being made by the National Library in Jerusalem.

Continues meetings with my new friends in Rome.

Benyimim

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Links

 

Delos Open Museum Restoration Project

The Ministry of Culture and Sports has presented a comprehensive plan for the protection and enhancement of the archaeological site of Delos that is being applied on multiple levels simultaneously.
Read more at
https://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.com/2019/05/delos-open-museum-restoration-project.html#tApKtmwpurIoyDFZ.99

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Typographia, or, The printers' instructor: including an account of the origin of printing, with biographical notices of the printers of England, from Caxton to the close of sixteenth century: a series of ancient and modern alphabets, and Domesday characters, together with an elucidation of every subject connected with the art. Volume 2

By John Johnson, Printer. Published by Messrs, Long, Hurst, Rees, Orme, Brown &Green, Paternoster Row, London. 1824, p. 307 link

 

Old News Article

The Washington Times (Washington, District of Columbia)

09 Dec. 1906, Sun. Page 10

 

American Seeking Samaritan Scroll

J. Pierpont Morgan Reported to Be Bidding on Scriptures

London: Dec. 8.- An American millionaire, supposed to be Pierpont Morgan, is trying to buy the copy of the Samaritan Scriptures which a deputation of the Samaritans- of whom there are only 500 left- brought to London some time ago. The price placed upon the scroll, which dates at about 1200 A.D., and of which there are only two copies in the world, is £5,000.

The British Museum offered one-fifth of that sum and now, Hector Donovan, in the interests of “an American” has raised the bidding to £10,000. The Museum authorities are certain to compete, and it is more than likely that America will be the destination of the ancient scroll, at a price far above that placed upon it by the venerable high priest.

The scroll is kept in a marvelous triple case of brass with silver inscriptions hammered into it. There are also silver gilt ornaments and rich embroideries which will be included in the sale. If the scroll does go to America there will be the usual outery- when it is too late.

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From the Editor

 

An interesting book I have not seen:

Bibles & Biblical Literature, Including the Best Works, Ancient & Modern, on the Criticism, Interpretation, and Illustration of Holy Scripture, Being a very complete and extensive Collection of bibles in all Languages, Biblical Commentators and Critics of all ages, sects, and languages, Jewish and Rabbinical Authors, the most important works in every department of Sacred Philology, History, and Antiquities, and other subjects by which the Bible is illustrated, with a Collection of Samaritan Manuscripts Including Three very ancient Pentateuchs, To Which are appended A minutely Classified Index of Authors, and Alphabetical Index of Subjects. by Charles John Stewart. 1872

 

London: C. J. Stewart, 8vo (190 x 125 mm), [6], 406 + 12pp., of adverts, unobtrusive library stamp to title page, orig. cloth, lacks spine title label, head of spine frayed. A substantial catalogue of 406 pages listing some 5685 antiquarian books.

 

An interesting audio: The Jewish and Samaritan schism. Lecture 5 of 24 by Magness, Jodi. hoopla digital. This Lecture: After the end of the Babylonian exile in 539 B.C., returning exiles began to reestablish themselves in Jerusalem under Ezra and Nehemiah. This return would lead to a dramatic schism between Jews and Samaritans - one which, as you'll learn, would influence encounters with Samaritans in Jesus's own time. The Course: 5. The Jewish and Samaritan Schism https://know.freelibrary.org/Record/2161426

 

The scroll case in the article above appears to be the case at the Jewish Museum today. See https://thejewishmuseum.org/collection/22404-torah-case-samaritan-torah-case-tik

 

The Jewish Museum (JM) say, ‘This case belongs to the earliest group of Torah cases to have survived; all five were made for the Samaritan community in the Near East during the sixteenth century. Three are still in use in the community today, while the fourth is at the University of Michigan.’

Yet the dating of the scroll according to the JM, has 1568 c. e., not the 1200 as the article mentions above.

It also appears that it was not J.P. Morgan that was reported to want to purchase the case, but Hadji Ephraim Benguiat (c. 1856-1932) and son, Mordecai Benguiat (1875- ?) both antiquities dealers.

 

The Fisher Libraries Samaritan scrolls

 

I had known very little of the Samaritan scrolls held at the Fisher Library in Sydney, Australia and the Fisher Library at University of Toronto. There is a brief confusion with the Sydney Fisher Library and the University of Toronto Fisher Library. The following sources should fill in the blanks:

 

Fisher Library at the University of Sydney, Australia


Rare Books & Special Collection in the (Thomas) Fisher Library, The University of Sydney, Australia

File no.  Add. Ms. 390 (Restricted) Barcode: 000000061893729

Acquisition Information: 1970s from an unknown private collection.

Dimensions: 30 sheet continuous Roll: Height 43.5 cm. Length 17.68 m.

Text body:  typical 33x 16 cm four columns of 17 cm width, Upper margin space 5 cm and lower 5.5 cm.

Subject: A Samaritan Torah scroll on paper.

Languages and scripts: Samaritan Hebrew.

Date: 1929-1930

Scribe: Jacob b. Ozzi (Azzi) b. Jacob b. Aaron( -1987).

Provenance: Nablus.

Colophons Fols.: unknown.

Codicology and codicography: two different inks on modern paper. Dry ruling lines on four columns. Typical four columns, two sheets three columns, three sheets have two columns and one sheet has a single column.

Catalogues and publication history:

Crown, Alan: Hebrew manuscripts and Rare printed Books Held in the Fisher Library of the University of Sydney. Studies in Australian Bibliography No. 20, General Editor- Walter W. Stone. Sydney” The Wentworth Press, 1973

 

The University of Toronto Fisher Library

 

The Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, The University of Toronto, Canada

File no.  MSS 08005 (formerly MSS 09251)

Acquisition Information: March 24, 1915; purchased in Nablus in June 1912 from the sons of the Priest, formally owned by James Frederic McCurdy (1847-1935), Professor of Oriental Languages at the University of Toronto, Hugh Hornby Langton (1862-1953), Librarian at the University of Toronto.

Dimensions: Height 43.5 cm. Length 17.68 m.

Text body:  33x16 cm. in four columns

Subject: A Samaritan Torah scroll on paper.

Languages and scripts: Samaritan Hebrew.

Date: 1911

Scribe: Tabiah (=Ghazâl) ben Pinhas ( -1843), other scribe unknown (written in two hands).

Provenance: Nablus.

Colophons Fols.: unknown.

Codicology and codicography: Ink on modern paper. Dry ruling lines on single column.

Catalogues and publication history: Walfish, Barry Dov “As it is Written”: Judaic Treasures from the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library Exhibition and catalogue. Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto 26 January to 1 May 2015

Reinhard Pummer, "Samaritan Manuscripts in Toronto" in Revue de l'Université d'Ottawa, vol. 46, no. 3 (July-September 1976), p. 345-363.

https://search.library.utoronto.ca/details?6970310&uuid=92a23970-d07f-44df-af38-03b4be35eeac

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Hill Museum & Manuscript Library  http://hmml.org/

Published on May 23, 2019

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NEK8_fk7NQ0

Dr. David Calabro, curator of Eastern Christian and Islamic Manuscripts, talks about the Samaritan Leaflet

 

 

The writing appears to read: ‘This fragment of ancient Samaritan was obtained March 16, 1864 at Nablous (Shechem) from the chief of the Samaritans at some expense of arrack and other considerations. From the book of the law- said to be of the times of the Kings?’

Jacob Shelaby was called the chief of the Samaritans by the London Newspapers and the date fits his timeline of selling manuscripts such as the Ms Fragment 37. It appears to be a true fragment!

In 1864, Samaritan priests quietly sold to the Russian collector Abraham (Avraham) ben Samuel Firkovich (1786–1874) 1,348 manuscripts.(The Editor)

The Hill Museum & Manuscript Library (HMML), located at Saint John’s University in Collegeville, Minnesota, holds the world’s largest archive of manuscript photographs in both microfilm and digital format. HMML identifies manuscript collections around the world that need photographic preservation. HMML’s archives now contain more than 200,000 complete manuscripts, ranging in size from large codices of hundreds of folios to brief documents consisting of just a few leaves.

Search: https://www.vhmml.org/readingRoom/

 

You will find below 5 manuscripts that are online at the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library

1 from Nablus

3 from Lebanon

2 from the Armenian in Aleppo. One of these has been recorded, yet the other one is a new discovery. Both mss have Samaritan liturgies placed in the Armenian books as fly-leaves both in the front and rear of the books. See below!!!

~~~~

 

Frag. 37: Manuscript Fragment contains Deuteronomy 4:49-5:18 (Shown above)

SJU Ms. Frag. 37

Place of Origin: Nablus

Century(ies)    19th century (?)

Year Range: 1800-1864

Support: Parchment

Support Dimensions    28.5 x 23.5 cm

Page Layout    1 column, 28 lines per page

Writing System: Hebrew

Script(s): Samaritan

Country: United States, Library of Congress Authorities VIAF

City:     Collegeville (Minn.) Library of Congress Authorities VIAF

Repository:      Saint John's University. Rare Books and Special Collections

Extent  1 leaf(ves)

See MS: https://www.vhmml.org/readingRoom/view/500879

 

Lebanon: MS AC 2 Samaritan Pentateuch

Shelfmark: MS AC 2

Current Status In situ

Century(ies)    19th century (?)

Language(s)    Arabic

Bibliography: James Pollock, Catalogue of Manuscripts of the Library of the Near Eastern School of Theology (1981).

HMML Proj. Num. NEST AC 00002

Permanent Link:          https://w3id.org/vhmml/readingRoom/view/505671

Acknowledgments       Cataloged by Salam Rassi

Extent  208 leaf(ves)

Provenance    

Commisioned copy made by one of the Syrian Mission's employees, according to Pollock in his 1981 catalog; among Eli Smith's reference works for the Bible translation project

Type    Manuscript

Part Location   fol. 1r-207v

Support            Paper

Writing Space 21.3 x 16 cm

Script(s)           Naskh

Item Location  fol. 3v-206r

Title     Samaritan Pentateuch

Title NS            التوراة

Uniform Title  Bible. Pentateuch  Library of Congress Authorities VIAF

Associated Name        Smith, Eli, 1801-1857 (Commissioner) Library of Congress Authorities VIAF

 

Lebanon: MS AC 3 Samaritan Pentateuch

Item Location  1v-215v

Title     Samaritan Pentateuch

Extent  216 leaf(ves)

Provenance: Copied by Samaritan scribe named صداقة بن ابراهبم بن الحكم ابو الفتح العبري الاسرائيلي اليوسفي القباسي in Ba'albak, rear flyleaf; among Eli Smith's reference works for his Bible translation project; copied from an exemplar in the Samaritan script, rear flyleaf; third book of the Pentateuch was copied from an exemplar dating to 4 Rabī‘ al-Thānī 833 AH (31 December 1429 CE), rear flyleaf

Support Dimensions    20.8 x 15.2 cm

Page Layout    One column, 18 lines per page

Script(s)           Naskh

Scribe  Ṣadāqah ibn Ibrāhīm ibn al-Ḥakam Abū al-Fatḥ al-‘Ibrī al-Isrā’īlī al-Yūsufī al-Qabbāsī

Country:          Lebanon  Library of Congress Authorities VIAF

City:     Beirut  Library of Congress Authorities VIAF

Repository:      Near East School of Theology  Library of Congress

Shelfmark:       MS AC 3

Century(ies):   19th century (?)

Language(s):   Arabic

Bibliography: James Pollock, Catalogue of Manuscripts of the Library of the Near Eastern School of Theology (1981).

HMML Proj. Num. NEST AC 00003

Permanent Link https://w3id.org/vhmml/readingRoom/view/505672

Acknowledgments       Cataloged by Salam Rassi

 

Lebanon: MS AC 4 Commentary on the Samaritan Pentateuch

Century(ies)    19th century

Language(s)    Arabic

Bibliography: James Pollock, Catalogue of Manuscripts of the Library of the Near Eastern School of Theology (1981).

HMML Proj. Num. NEST AC 00004

Permanent Link           https://w3id.org/vhmml/readingRoom/view/505673

Acknowledgments       Cataloged by Salam Rassi

Surrogate Format       Digital

Capture Date  2010/02/23

Access Restrictions     Registered or order a digital copy

Type of Record            Manuscript

Provenance: Copy made for Eli Smith by one Samaritan priest from Nablus عبده عمران بن سلامة بن غزة بن اسحاق ابن ابراهيم, rear flyleaf; probably among Eli Smith's reference works for his Bible translation project, according to Pollock in his 1981 catalog

Part Location   fol. 1v-175v

Century(ies)    19th century

Date Precise    1853 September 05

Native Date Precise    31 Dhū al-Qa‘dah 1269 AH

Support            Paper

Page Layout    1 column, 18 lines per page

Writing Space 20.7 x 14.8 cm

Writing System           Arabic

Script(s)           Naskh

Scribe  ‘Abduh ‘Umrān ibn Salāmah ibn Ghazzah ibn Isḥāq ibn Ibrāhīm

Scribe NS         عبده عمران بن سلامة بن غزة بن اسحاق ابن ابراهيم

Colophon on rear flyleaf

Item Location  fol. 1v-175v

Title     Commentary on the Pentateuch

Title NS            شرح المعاجيز

Alternate Title Sharḥ al-ma‘ājīz

Alternate Title Memar Marqah

Associated Name        Smith, Eli, 1801-1857 Library of Congress Authorities VIAF

Language(s)    Arabic

Item Notes: Translated from the Samaritan for Eli Smith; attributed to the fourth century Samaritan author Marqah ben Amram ben Sered, active 4th century

 

MS 30: Armenian book’s Front and back flyleaves from old Samaritan manuscript

Country           Syria  Library of Congress Authorities VIAF

City      Aleppo  Library of Congress Authorities VIAF

Repository       Armenian Church. Diocese of Aleppo

Shelfmark        MS 30

Current Status Unknown

Century(ies)    15th-16th century

Year Range     1400-1600

Support            Paper

Language(s)    Armenian

Genre(s)          Gospel books

Bibliography    Artavazd Surméyan, Catalogue des manuscrits arméniens se trouvant à Alep à l'église des Quarante Martyrs, ainsi qu'auprès des particuliers (1935).

HMML Proj. Num.       AODA 00030

Permanent Link           https://w3id.org/vhmml/readingRoom/view/130510  

Acknowledgments       Cataloged by Edward Mathews Jr.

Surrogate Format       Digital

Capture Date  2010/12/11

Type of Record            Manuscript

Extent  539 page(s)

Collation          viii + 539 + ix

Binding            Leather binding. Front and back flyleaves from old Samaritan manuscript

Binding Dimensions    17 x 13.5 x 5 cm

Provenance     Formerly ms. 101

Writing System           Armenian

Script(s)           Bolorgir

Scribe  Barsegh

Notes   Colophon found on pages 534-539.

Item Location  pages 1-533

Title NS            Աւետերան

Uniform Title  Bible. Gospels  Library of Congress Authorities VIAF

Item Notes      Gospel text ends with appended pericope of woman caught in adultery

Bibliography:   Artavazd Surméyan, Catalogue des manuscrits arméniens se trouvant à Alep à l'église des Quarante Martyrs, ainsi qu'auprès des particuliers (1935).

 

MS 56: Armenian book’s Front and back flyleaves from old Samaritan manuscript

Country: Syria  Library of Congress Authorities VIAF

City      Aleppo  Library of Congress Authorities VIAF

Repository       Armenian Church. Diocese of Aleppo

Shelfmark        MS 56

Current Status Unknown

Century(ies)    17th century

Language(s)    Armenian

Genre(s)          Bibles

Bibliography    Artavazd Surméyan, Catalogue des manuscrits arméniens se trouvant à Alep à l'église des Quarante Martyrs, ainsi qu'auprès des particuliers (1935).

HMML Proj. Num. AODA 00056

Permanent Link           https://w3id.org/vhmml/readingRoom/view/130959

Acknowledgments       Cataloged by Edward Mathews Jr.

Surrogate Format       Digital

Capture Date  2011/02/10

Access Restrictions     Registered or order a digital copy

Type of Record            Manuscript

Extent  336 page(s)

Collation          viii + 336 + iv

Binding            Leather binding. Front and back flyleaves from Samaritan manuscript

Binding Dimensions    26.5 x 19.8 x 3.5 cm

Provenance     Formerly ms. 109

Place of Origin            Syria, Aleppo

Century(ies)    17th century

Native Date Precise    1619 AC

Support            Paper

Page Layout    23 lines per page

Signatures       Yes

Writing System           Armenian

Script(s)           Bolorgir

Scribe  Ghazar

Decoration      Usual liturgical headers and highlighted initial letters, etc.

Notes   Colophon found on pages 316-318. Dated from colophon on page 316

Item Location  pages 1-336

Title NS            Սաղմոս

Uniform Title  Bible. Psalms,  Library of Congress Authorities VIAF

Item Notes      Biblical prayers and canticles interspersed and at end

 

Codex des Kärntner Landesarchiv GV 8/12

Country:          Austria  Library of Congress Authorities VIAF

City:     Klagenfurt  Library of Congress Authorities VIAF

Repository       Kärntner Landesarchiv  Library of Congress Authorities VIAF

Shelfmark        Codex des Kärntner Landesarchiv GV 8/12

Century(ies)    14th century

Language(s)    Hebrew

Genre(s)          Bibles

Ext. Bibliography         H. Menhardt, Handschriftenverzeichnis der Kärntner Bibliotheken (1927), 184-254.

HMML Proj. Num.  12876

Permanent Link           https://w3id.org/vhmml/readingRoom/view/13262

Type of Record            Manuscript

Extent  10 leaf(ves)

Place of Origin            : Austria

Century(ies)    14th century

Year Range     1300-1400

Writing System           Roman

Title     Bible. Numbers

Uniform Title  Bible. Numbers Library of Congress Authorities VIAF

Item Notes      Book of Numbers in Hebrew with Samaritan script: includes Numbers 16:14 to 28:10

~~~~~~~~~~

 

The Samaritan Community in Aleppo

 

Nathan Schur believes the Aleppo  Samaritan community disappeared in the 17th century.  Henry Maundrell or Robert Huntington, an Anglican chaplain of the English Factory at Aleppo lived in Aleppo 10 years only to visit the Samaritans at Nablus in 1671. He mentions no Samaritan community at the time in Aleppo.  Yet, Pietro della Valle found Samaritans in Aleppo. Pietro Della Valle, a famous book collector. "In a letter written in Damascus and Aleppo, dated June 15, 1616, della Valle described his delight at finding some rare Samaritan manuscripts, some of them with glosses in Arabic, for sale.  Thomas Davis was an English merchant for the Levant Company stationed in Aleppo in 1624. After receiving a request from Bishop Usher secured a Samaritan Pentateuch from one of Davis’ caravans had crossed paths while traveling from Nablus to Gaza with the last Samaritan High Priest Shalmaiah ben Pinhas ben Eleazar, the last High Priest of the family of Pinhas.

Even since 1624 there has been no mention of any Samaritans in Aleppo. Yet, the Armenian Church manuscript/s of 1619 denotes their access to Samaritan manuscripts.

It should also be of interest that the Armenian archdiocese in Aleppo was established in 1710. Therefore the books were written before the establishment of that church. Where the books originated is a good question that may never be answered. But most likely they came from Damascus.

Moses Gaster said, ‘The only reference to the Samaritans in Aleppo which I can trace is in an Arabic translation of the Pentateuch of 1328.’(The Samaritans, page 153)

In 1537 while in Jerusalem, the Jesuit priest (ordained in 1544) Guillaume Postel (1510-1581) has been said to be the first Westerner to acquire Samaritan manuscripts. Records indicate that Postel was the first to recognize Samaritan script on coins as has been recorded in his Linguanim duodecim characteribus (Paris, 1538). Fraser indicates that Postel had one Samaritan manuscript, now located at the University of Leiden MS Acad. 218. Did he acquired it in Constantinople or Jerusalem?

J.J. Scaliger acquired in 1584, two Samaritan manuscripts, with one being the Samaritan Arabic book of Joshua (MS Leiden Or. 249).

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Reprint from the Samaritan Update January 16, 2003

A Pentateuch in Wyoming  

   by Anne Marie Lane (RETIRED 2018)

   In the American Heritage Center of the University of Wyoming, USA there is in the Toppan Rare Books Library, a Manuscript of the Pentateuch, apparently written in Samaritan characters.

    What a pleasant surprise to read an email from Shomron. It is the first inquiry I have had (in my 9 years here) about the Samaritan Pentateuch. It is a special favorite that I bring out for presentations on book history and books of different religions. It is small, a hand-held version, just over 4 inches high and 3 inches wide, 400 pages long, hand-sewn with red thread, and has the traditional "flap" binding. The leather is a light to medium brown (goatskin?), and has an incised cross (like this: X ) on both the front and back, each within a panel of incised lines. The spine has 21 horizontal lines inscribed from top to bottom. The paper is very thin, almost like modern airmail paper, and is a cream color. The ink is extremely black, and the whole book is handwritten in a remarkably tiny script. 

    I do not know the conditions of the book ending up here in Wyoming, except to say that the manual cataloging record I have (the book is not cataloged online yet) says it was acquired in 1967 as a William Fitzhugh gift. Dr. Fitzhugh (of California) donated both books and money to buy other books, so I'm not sure if he himself had bought it while traveling somewhere. The cataloging record also notes that it is from "Nablus, Palestine, circa 1750," so it is quite old.   

Anne Marie Lane (RETIRED 2018)
Faculty Curator of Rare Books 
Toppan Library, American Heritage Center 
P.O. Box 3924, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY  82071 
http://www.uwyo.edu/ahc/depts/toppan/toppan.htm

~~~~

 

Pentateuch in Wyoming Catalogue Information

Country: United States

City: Laramie, WY

Repository: Toppan Library, University of Wyoming,

Press-mark. 

File no.

Dimensions: just over 4 inches high and 3 inches wide

Subject: Samaritan Pentateuch

Acquisition information: Acquired in 1967 as a gift from Dr. William Fitzhugh (of California).

Catalogues and Publication history: The Samaritan Update January 16, 2003

Languages and scripts: Samaritan Hebrew

Scribe: unknown

Date: circa 1750 (unverified)

Provenance: Nablus.

Colophons:

Codicology and codicography: 400 pages long, hand-sewn with red thread, and has the traditional "flap" binding. The parchment is a light to medium brown and has an incised cross (like this: X ) on both the front and back, each within a panel of incised lines. The spine has 21 horizontal lines inscribed from top to bottom. The paper is very thin and is a cream color. The ink is extremely black, and the whole book is handwritten in a remarkably tiny script. 

 

Summary of one sample folio:

Acknowledgments: Catalogued by Anne Marie Lane.

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Additional digitized MSS @ the British Library

 

Published #HebrewProject Phase 2: Or 5037, a Samaritan liturgy for Passover from 1705/1706. Digitised and available online here:

http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/FullDisplay.aspx?ref=Or_5037

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Books by Benyamim Tsedaka

A Complete Commentary on the Torah

based on the Israelite Samaritan Version of the Torah as it has been delivered for the past 125 generations, since it was originally written by Mooshee Ban ’Aamraam [Moses ben ‘Amram] the Prophet of all prophets.

 

Understanding the Israelite-Samaritans

The first publication in English - concentrated information on the Israelite Samaritans - From Ancient to Modern by Benyamim Tsedaka

 

See his selection of Samaritan writings

https://www.israelite-samaritans.com/books/

Also Subscribe to the A.B. The Samaritan News

See details at https://www.israelite-samaritans.com/samaritan-newspaper/

 

Book Proposal

Also see the proposal for the Samaritan Cookbook https://www.israelite-samaritans.com/books/samaritan-cookbook/

Book Link

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New Publications:

 

The Samaritan Pentateuch and the Dead Sea Scrolls

 

Series:  Contributions to Biblical Exegesis & Theology, 94

Editor:  Langlois M.   

Year: 2019

ISBN: 978-90-429-3783-3

Pages: X-325 p.

Price: 64 EURO

Summary: Seventy years after their discovery, the Dead Sea Scrolls continue to shed light on the Samaritan Pentateuch. The textual features, orthography, script, variant readings and even theology of the Samaritan Pentateuch have parallels in various manuscripts found in the Judaean desert and copied during the Second Temple period. The fertile encounter of Samaritan and Dead Sea Scrolls studies has yielded this exceptional volume, featuring twelve contributions by some of the most respected scholars gathered at the University of Strasbourg on May 26–27, 2016. They cover such issues as scribal and editorial practices, political and religious history, textual editions and versions, palaeography and linguistics—with provocative studies challenging classical theories on the origin of the Gerizim tenth commandment or the date of the earliest Dead Sea Scrolls. http://www.peeters-leuven.be/boekoverz.asp?nr=10894

 

The Samaritans in Historical, Cultural and Linguistic Perspectives

Ed. By Jan Dusek

Series: Studia Samaritana 11 Studia Judaica 110

Oct. 2018

xiv, 341 pages, 20 Fig. Language: English

Aims and Scope

The volume contributes to the knowledge of the Samaritan history, culture and linguistics. Specialists of various fields of research bring a new look on the topics related to the Samaritans and the Hebrew and Arabic written sources, to the Samaritan history in the Roman-Byzantine period as well as to the contemporary issues of the Samaritan community.

 

Leviticus: Volume III

by Stefan Schorch (Editor)

A critical edition of the Samaritan Pentateuch is one of the most urgent desiderata of Hebrew Bible research. The present volume on Leviticus is the first out of a series of five meant to fill this gap. The text from the oldest manuscripts of the SP is continuously accompanied by comparative readings, gathered from the Samaritan Targum and the oral reading, as well as MT, the DSS, and the LXX, creating an indispensable resource for Biblical research.

Print Length: 251 pages

Publisher: De Gruyter

Publication Date: July 2018

Language: English, Hebrew

 

The Bible, Qumran, and the Samaritans

Series: Studia Samaritana 10 Ed.

by Kartveit, Magnar / Knoppers, Gary N.

Aims and Scope: Discoveries on Mount Gerizim and in Qumran demonstrate that the final editing of the Hebrew Bible coincides with the emergence of the Samaritans as one of the different types of Judaisms from the last centuries BCE. This book discusses this new scholarly situation. Scholars working with the Bible, especially the Pentateuch, and experts on the Samaritans approach the topic from the vantage point of their respective fields of expertise. Earlier, scholars who worked with Old Testament/Hebrew Bible studies mostly could TheSamaritanUpdate.com May / June 2018 16 leave the Samaritan material to experts in that area of research, and scholars studying the Samaritan material needed only sporadically to engage in Biblical studies. This is no longer the case: the pre-Samaritan texts from Qumran and the results from the excavations on Mount Gerizim have created an area of study common to the previously separated fields of research. Scholars coming from different directions meet in this new area, and realize that they work on the same questions and with much common material. This volume presents the current state of scholarship in this area and the effects these recent discoveries have for an understanding of this important epoch in the development of the Bible.

Publisher: De Gruyter. Publication Date: July 2018, 214 pages English

 

 Seeking out the Land: Land of Israel Traditions in Ancient Jewish, Christian and Samaritan Literature (200 BCE – 400 CE), Se’ev Safrai, Brill Academic Publishers, 2018. ISBN 9789004334823

Seeking out the Land describes the study of the Holy Land in the Roman period and examines the complex connections between theology, social agenda and the intellectual pursuit. Holiness as a theological concept determines the intellectual agenda of the elite society of writers seeking to describe the land, as well as their preoccupation with its physical aspects and their actual knowledge about it. 
Ze'ev Safrai succeeds in examining all the ancient monotheistic literature, both Jewish and Christian, up to the fourth century CE, and in demonstrating how all the above-mentioned factors coalesce into a single entity. We learn that in both religions, with all their various subgroups, the same social and religious factors were at work, but with differing intensity. 

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Bibliography

Haji, Nihad

Editor in Chief, Larq journal for philosohpy, linguistics and social sciences and researcher of the Samaritan sect

Researches published in various scientific journals

- Features of the linguistic movement of Jews in the Middle Ages 2013.

- The Jewish community of Samaritans 2013.

- Introduction to the study of Hebrew Samaritan language 2013.

- The Samaria community between Jewish rejection and the reality of the Assyrian texts 2014.

- Miscellaneous Tales of the Samaritan Heritage in the Middle Ages Study and Investigation 2014.

- Arabic Language of Medieval Jewish Literature 2014.  

- Effect of the Arabic linguistic term in the Hebrew term Samaritan 2015.

- Manuscripts in Samaritan community tests investigated and studied 2015.

- Linguistic convergence between The Karaites Grammar School and the Samaritan school in the middle Ages 2016.

- The Samaritan Savior Age of "Tahib" is a comparative study in the Semitic holy texts. 2019

- Iraq Between the Jewish And the Samaritan texts of the Pentateuch: A comparative Study in the Archaeology of the Holly Bible 2019

- The Historical Roots and Their Civilization Origins in Palestine:An Applied Study in the Ancient Texts 2019

 

Himbaza, Innocent. “Looking at the Samaritan Pentateuch from Qumran: Legal Material of Leviticus and Deuteronomy.” In The Samaritan Pentateuch and the Dead Sea Scrolls. Ed. by Michael Langlois. Pages 199-216. Contributions to Biblical Exegesis & Theology 94. Leuven: Peeters, 2019.

Joosten, Jan. “Biblical Interpretation in the Samareitikon as Exemplified in Anonymous Readings in Leviticus Attested in M′.” In The Samaritan Pentateuch and the Dead Sea Scrolls. Ed. by Michael Langlois. Pages 313-325. Contributions to Biblical Exegesis & Theology 94. Leuven: Peeters, 2019.

Kartveit, Magnar. “Scholars’ Assessments of the Relationship between the Pre-Samaritan Texts and the Samaritan Pentateuch.” In The Samaritan Pentateuch and the Dead Sea Scrolls. Ed. by Michael Langlois. Pages 1-18. Contributions to Biblical Exegesis & Theology 94. Leuven: Peeters, 2019.

Knoppers, Gary N. “Altared States: The Altar Laws in the Samaritan and Jewish Pentateuchs, and Their Early Interpreters.” In The Samaritan Pentateuch and the Dead Sea Scrolls. Ed. by Michael Langlois. Pages 99-126. Contributions to Biblical Exegesis & Theology 94. Leuven: Peeters, 2019.

Langlois, Michael. “Dead Sea Scrolls Palaeography and the Samaritan Pentateuch.” In The Samaritan Pentateuch and the Dead Sea Scrolls. Ed. by Michael Langlois. Pages 255-286. Contributions to Biblical Exegesis & Theology 94. Leuven: Peeters, 2019.

 

Noseda, Sergio Noja

Bibliographia Selecta: Sergio Noja Noseda / List of Sergio Noja Noseda’s Publications Research (PDF Available) · August 2017

 

Schorch, Stefan. “The So-Called Gerizim Commandment in the Samaritan Pentateuch.” In The Samaritan Pentateuch and the Dead Sea Scrolls. Ed. by Michael Langlois. Pages 77-98. Contributions to Biblical Exegesis & Theology 94. Leuven: Peeters, 2019.

Stadel, Christian. “Variegation in Second Temple Period Hebrew: Passive t-Stems, the הלז Demonstrative Series, and אפוא in Samaritan Hebrew and in the Dead Sea Scrolls.” In The Samaritan Pentateuch and the Dead Sea Scrolls. Ed. by Michael Langlois. Pages 287-312. Contributions to Biblical Exegesis & Theology 94. Leuven: Peeters, 2019.

Tal, Abraham. “Do the Samaritan Pentateuch and 1QIsaᵃ Follow the Same Model?” In The Samaritan Pentateuch and the Dead Sea Scrolls. Ed. by Michael Langlois. Pages 243-254. Contributions to Biblical Exegesis & Theology 94. Leuven: Peeters, 2019.

 

Tov, Emanuel. “From Popular Jewish LXX-SP Texts to Separate Sectarian Texts: Insights from the Dead Sea Scrolls.” In The Samaritan Pentateuch and the Dead Sea Scrolls. Ed. by Michael Langlois. Pages 19-40. Contributions to Biblical Exegesis & Theology 94. Leuven: Peeters, 2019.

van der Meer, Michaël N. “Exclusion and Expansion: Harmonisations in the Samaritan Pentateuch, Pre-Samaritan Pentateuchal Manuscripts and Non-Pentateuchal Manuscripts.” In The Samaritan Pentateuch and the Dead Sea Scrolls. Ed. by Michael Langlois. Pages 41-76. Contributions to Biblical Exegesis & Theology 94. Leuven: Peeters, 2019.

 

Ziemer, Benjamin. “A Stemma for Deuteronomy.” In The Samaritan Pentateuch and the Dead Sea Scrolls. Ed. by Michael Langlois. Pages 127-198. Contributions to Biblical Exegesis & Theology 94. Leuven: Peeters, 2019.

~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

Biblio

 

Black, Archibald Pollok

A Hundred days in the East: A Diary of a Journey to Eygypt, Palestine, Turkey in Europe, Greece, the Isles of the Archipelago, and Italy. London: John F. Shaw & Co. 1865

 

Choi, Hyun-Joon

Some Grammatical Features of the Samaritan Pentateuch Hebrew: Comparative Study with the Tiberian Hebrew 2010

 

Cook, Augusta

By Way of the East; or, Gathered Light from our Travels in Palestine, Egypt, Smyma, Ephesus. London: Robert banks & sons, 1908, (second edition) Radium Larger Series

 

Crown, Alan

Hebrew manuscripts and Rare printed Books Held in the Fisher Library of the University of Sydney. Studies in Australian Bibliography No. 20, General Editor- Walter W. Stone. Sydney” The Wentworth Press, 1973

 

Lay Member of the Committee

Journal of a Deputation Sent to the East by the Committee of the Malta Protestant College in 1849: Containing an Account of the Present State of the Oriental Nations, Including Their Religion, Learning, Education, Customs, and Occupations: With Outlines of their Ecclesiastical and Political History, of the Rise and Decay of Knowledge Among them; and of the Doctrines and Discipline of the Ancient Christian Churches. By a Lay member of the Committee. Part II London: James Nisbet and Co. 1854

 

Montmollin, Edouard de

Des Samaritains et de l’origine de leur Secte (These) Universite de Geneneve 1951

 

Scales, J.

(Review) (2019); ‘Ze’ev Safrai, 2018. Seeking out the Land: Land of Israel Traditions in Ancient Jewish, Christian and Samaritan Literature (200 BCE–400 CE). Jewish and Christian Perspectives 32. Leiden; Boston, MA: Brill. Pp. xv & 556. €160.00/$184.00 (Hbk). ISBN: 978-9-0043-3479-3.’Rosetta 24: 57-59 http://www.rosetta.bham.ac.uk/issue24/Scales.pdf 

 

Schorch, Stefan

The So Called Gerizim Commandment in the Samaritan Pentateuch in The Samaritan Pentateuch and the Dead Sea Scrolls, ed. M. Langlois (Peeters), 2019

The Gerizim composition found in the Samaritan text of the Ten Commandments in Exod 20 and Deut 5, according to medieval manuscripts, presents a deliberate scribal attempt to stress some main points of Pentateuchal hermeneutics, completely in line with the hermeneutics and the literary techniques attested in the pre-Samaritan textual layer. Nothing in the Gerizim composition itself, or in its insertion at these points of the Pentateuch narrative, is specifically “Samaritan.” Rather, the authors of this insertion seem to have been part of the scribal culture shared by followers of both the Jerusalem and Gerizim sanctuary.

 

Walfish, Barry Dov

“As it is Written”: Judaic Treasures from the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library Exhibition and catalogue. Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library, University of Toronto 26 January to 1 May 2015

 

Williams, George Rev.

‘Biblical Illustrations’ in Authorized Report of the Church Congress Held at Dublin, on September 29th, 30th, October 1st, 2nd, 3rd. 1868. Dublin: Hodges, Smith & Foster, 1868, p 385- 402.

 

Wilson, John

The Lands of the Bible: Visited and Described in an Extensive Journey Undertaken With Special Reference to the Promotion of Biblical Research and the Advancement of the Cause of Philanthropy. Edinburgh: William Whyte and Co. 1847, Volume 2

 

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